1. lesbolizzzytits:

marbleousmego:

igohardinovertime:

blacktionbronson:

mrkittykatface:

luduslad:

wishingonalightningbolt:

Same reason professional football players are paid more than scientists or professors. Same reason a tenured professor at a university is paid less than that university’s football coach.
Because the US values athleticism over academia. And it sucks.

Nope, it’s called being paid for the monetary value you bring. If you make 1 million dollars but help bring in 10 million you are a great value.

But honestly what are they bringing to society? Nothing. Just because you make the money doesn’t mean you’re an asset.

Have you ever been to america?

that tweet is so stupid 

Actually, it’s a legit problem that these kids are being admitted into college. Sure they bring money, but they are not equipped to handle college. And look, I was an NCAA D1 athlete. I’m a huge football fan. I see the cash these kids bring into the school. But it’s a huge issue.
Look at this CNN article from earlier this year.
Some highlights:

A CNN investigation found public universities across the country where many students in the basketball and football programs could read only up to an eighth-grade level….
As a graduate student at UNC-Greensboro, Willingham researched the reading levels of 183 UNC-Chapel Hill athletes who played football or basketball from 2004 to 2012. She found that 60% read between fourth- and eighth-grade levels. Between 8% and 10% read below a third-grade level….
The issue was highlighted at UNC two years ago with the exposure of a scandal where students, many of them athletes, were given grades for classes they didn’t attend, and where they did nothing more than turn in a single paper….
According to those academic experts, the threshold for being college-literate is a score of 400 on the SAT critical reading or writing test. On the ACT, that threshold is 16. Many student-athletes scored in the 200s and 300s on the SAT critical reading test — a threshold that experts told us was an elementary reading level and too low for college classes. The lowest score possible on that part of the SAT is 200, and the national average is 500….

I recommend you read the entire article. But it IS a problem. You can look at it from a money making perspective, sure. But don’t ignore the fact that a lot of these student-athletes are not even close to being prepared for college. They have the athlete part down, but not the student. While I was being recruited and watched peers be recruited, coaches often would sign just enough kids with high scores to average out the very talented, but lower-score athletes. Recruits in the middle— those who didn’t have superior grades or skill— were often overlooked or told to come back when their grades were better.
Sports fans, I’m sorry, I’m with you. But this is a big issue when illiterate students are taking the spot of well-educated students simply because they can make money for the university. And don’t get me started on how dangerous football is, and how most of the athletes won’t have more than used-up scholarship money to help with their medical expenses down the line.

College is a corrupted system.

    lesbolizzzytits:

    marbleousmego:

    igohardinovertime:

    blacktionbronson:

    mrkittykatface:

    luduslad:

    wishingonalightningbolt:

    Same reason professional football players are paid more than scientists or professors. Same reason a tenured professor at a university is paid less than that university’s football coach.

    Because the US values athleticism over academia. And it sucks.

    Nope, it’s called being paid for the monetary value you bring. If you make 1 million dollars but help bring in 10 million you are a great value.

    But honestly what are they bringing to society? Nothing. Just because you make the money doesn’t mean you’re an asset.

    Have you ever been to america?

    that tweet is so stupid 

    Actually, it’s a legit problem that these kids are being admitted into college. Sure they bring money, but they are not equipped to handle college. And look, I was an NCAA D1 athlete. I’m a huge football fan. I see the cash these kids bring into the school. But it’s a huge issue.

    Look at this CNN article from earlier this year.

    Some highlights:

    A CNN investigation found public universities across the country where many students in the basketball and football programs could read only up to an eighth-grade level….

    As a graduate student at UNC-Greensboro, Willingham researched the reading levels of 183 UNC-Chapel Hill athletes who played football or basketball from 2004 to 2012. She found that 60% read between fourth- and eighth-grade levels. Between 8% and 10% read below a third-grade level….

    The issue was highlighted at UNC two years ago with the exposure of a scandal where students, many of them athletes, were given grades for classes they didn’t attend, and where they did nothing more than turn in a single paper….

    According to those academic experts, the threshold for being college-literate is a score of 400 on the SAT critical reading or writing test. On the ACT, that threshold is 16. Many student-athletes scored in the 200s and 300s on the SAT critical reading test — a threshold that experts told us was an elementary reading level and too low for college classes. The lowest score possible on that part of the SAT is 200, and the national average is 500….

    I recommend you read the entire article. But it IS a problem. You can look at it from a money making perspective, sure. But don’t ignore the fact that a lot of these student-athletes are not even close to being prepared for college. They have the athlete part down, but not the student. While I was being recruited and watched peers be recruited, coaches often would sign just enough kids with high scores to average out the very talented, but lower-score athletes. Recruits in the middle— those who didn’t have superior grades or skill— were often overlooked or told to come back when their grades were better.

    Sports fans, I’m sorry, I’m with you. But this is a big issue when illiterate students are taking the spot of well-educated students simply because they can make money for the university. And don’t get me started on how dangerous football is, and how most of the athletes won’t have more than used-up scholarship money to help with their medical expenses down the line.

    College is a corrupted system.
    Reblogged from: lesbolizzzytits
  2. aurynauryn:

    blathh:

    Actual Mermaid.

    Photographer & MUA: Sophie Boosey
    Model: Blath

    You need more Blath in swamps on your dash trust me

    Reblogged from: wednesdayfullofwoe
  3. colossus1921 replied to your post “Time for my rant, as promised”

    It’s not stupid to be upset when people are assholes. There are plenty of stupid reasons to be upset, but that isn’t one of them.

    kellyclowers replied to your post “Time for my rant, as promised”

    Wow. They have some gall. Jeez. Sorry to hear things are like that

    *sigh* thanks, guys. It’s good to know I’m not just crazy and over analyzing things.

  4. mongonga:

Dames of Throne - GoT inspired Burlesque Illustrations by Chris Wahl

    mongonga:

    Dames of Throne - GoT inspired Burlesque Illustrations by Chris Wahl

    Reblogged from: jaimescersei
  5. Orange is the New Black: a summary

    Reblogged from: lesbolizzzytits
  6. pipspenguin007:

    Where do I sign up for Badassery Lessons with the Wise Ones?

    Reblogged from: pipspenguin007
  7. severely-awesome:

    Anti-Friendzone Makeup Tutorial //Ver.1Ver. 2

    Reblogged from: yall-mothafuckas-need-misha
  8. livia-sedai replied to your post “I just really want one more person to like my 22nd birthday Instagram…”

    I don’t have instagram, but happy birthday!

    Thank you so much <3

  9. pettymotives:

    I relate to villains and side-kicks because I relate to feeling perceived as a liability or a burden.
    I relate to being able to rationalize my side of the story, but never able to truly justify it.
    And I relate to not “redeeming” myself because I don’t agree with the hero’s judgement and philosophy, but I also see how that may lead to my ultimate downfall.
    I relate to “villainous breakdowns”, because I wonder if I will also abandon everything that I stubbornly stood by when my ruin is self-evident. Will I throw away my standards as they do? Are they standards that can be thrown away, or will I go down with them?
    I relate to villains because I am particular, and I won’t give up my particularities for the sake of being practical. The fine line between a villain and a hero is that a hero’s unbreakable standards are ultimately condoned by something outside of themselves (the narrative, the community, the audience), but the only one who condones the villain’s pickiness is themselves and yet they keep doing them anyway. I just do my thing. I don’t know if it’s right or wrong and frankly it doesn’t seem to matter because for me, my principles aren’t up for debate - I will not change them until I see fit to do so, and never before.

    Reblogged from: pettymotives
  10. Read more
  11. At what point do you take girls out of school altogether because boys can’t handle it?

    Parent of a female teen whose school banned leggings

    #yesallwomen have a right to an education without fashion policing by sexist administrators

    (via maxximalist)

    Reblogged from: ass-full-of-cass
  12. sixpenceee:

The following is a rolling shutter illusion

    sixpenceee:

    The following is a rolling shutter illusion

    Reblogged from: sixpenceee
  13. *boom*

    • mom: what was that?
    • me: my shirt fell
    • mom: it sounded a lot heavier than that...
    • me: i was in it
    Reblogged from: masterofbirds
  14. patrickat:

    spyderqueen:

    misandrwitch:

    Hands up if large groups of aggressively loud white boys in your vicinity freak you out

    One of the things that bonds women, POC, and LGBTQA+ together: The fear of white men in numbers.

    Did you mean: Congress?

    Reblogged from: i-lost-my-doctor
  15. thranduil-stormborn:

    naturemetaltolkien:

    Tolkien died in 1973. Reverse it and you get 3791.
    Three rings for the elven kings under the sky, seven for the dwarf-lords in their halls of stone, nine for mortal men doomed to die, and one for the dark lord on his dark throne.

    image

    Reblogged from: of-the-yellow-ajah
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